Author Archives: Cameron M

Reading/Listening List Roundup: July 2017

Free time coding has been non-existent lately. But I have been catching up on podcasts and articles.

https://dev.to/ben/my-three-tips-for-maintaining-fitness-and-a-healthy-lifestyle-as-a-software-developer

http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/257-hiring-rebecca-murphey-lon-ingram/

http://shoptalkshow.com/episodes/258-design-ethics-robyn-kanner-mike-monteiro/

http://itsalljournalism.com/251-tribeworthy-wants-to-be-yelp-for-news-consumers/

http://supportops.co/132-share-often/

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Readings on Security

I was doing a number of security code audits over the last few months, and in that time, a number of interesting and in depth articles crossed my media feeds.  Here’s a quick reading list rundown for the security minded. Continue reading

Basic Style Guides in WordPress

I have built or maintained a number of custom WordPress themes over the last few years and I’m big on making testing/validation as easy as possible.  I’ve had some experience with unit testing through my Symfony and Python work and I wanted to do the same with WordPress.  However, testing the look and feel of a website doesn’t easily fall within the scope of unit tests. When I first heard people talking about style guides, it felt like an intriguing and natural solution to this problem… But how to make use of it?

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Cleaning a git repo

This is the nature of maintaining software.  You step into a role and are handed a repository of code.  There may be a lot of it, and it’s quality is questionable at best.  There may even be a ton of cruft.  I recently encountered one such repo involving a 7 year old WordPress Multisite. Additionally, there were a number of custom database tables and php CRUD apps were built alongside & intertwined with this MU instance.  About a year before I joined the project, the old Multisite instance became the basis for a new website, and a number of themes, plugins, library code, and log files were unnecessarily added to the new repository.  Even if one performs git rm, those files will still remain in the history and would be downloaded with every new clone.  Since it was still relatively early enough in the project’s history (and that I was the only active developer), I decided to try some more advanced git magic to purge these files.

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